Ancient idol of Tirthankar Adinath found at Arang

Source: The Hitavada      Date: 19 May 2016 13:54:16


The ancient sculpture of Adinath found at Arang.

(Pic by Manoj Dewangan)

Staff Reporter,

RAIPUR,

May 18,

The sculpture is 1.16 metres in height, 37 cms in width and 21cms in thickness.

An ancient sculpture of Adinath, the first Tirthankar of the Digambar Jain Sect, was found at Arang on the opportune day of the International Museum Day on Wednesday and this sculpture was brought to the Mahant Ghasidas Museum in the State capital. The sculpture is datable to the 5th, 6th Century AD.
A seminar on ‘Museum in Past, Present and Future’ was going on today and during that time the Archaeological Advisor, Government of Chhattisgarh, A K Sharma received a phone call from police constables Bansilal Sahu and Rishi Keskar of Arang police station that a huge sculpture made of stone was found in a Nullah 5 kms East of Arang where soil digging is going on. Earlier, an idol of Lord Ganesh was found in this village Paragaon.
Sharma today rushed to the spot and found that a large crowd was offering flowers and ‘Gulal’ to the sculpture. ‘On close examination the sculpture came out to be of Adinath, the first Tirthankar of the Digambar Jain Sect. The sculpture is 1.16 metres in height, 37 cms in width and 21cms in thickness. This standing sculpture has a ‘Yaksha’ and ‘Yakshini’ near the knee region on two sides. The sculpture is datable to the 5th, 6th Century AD,” Sharma told The Hitavada. He also mentioned in the context that Buddha has clockwise curly hairs and Tirthankar’s hairs are curly anticlockwise.
Adinath statues are very rare and one of smaller size was found during excavation at Sirpur in Mahasamund district. Arang in Raipur district is a known religious spot of Jains, where huge Bhand-Deul temple is located and this site is protected by the Archaeological Survey of India. The local name of the Nullah in which the sculpture was found today is ‘Nangda Nullah’ and that means people knew that a temple with naked statue was in the village. In Chhattisgarhi, ‘Nangda’ means naked, said Sharma.
According to Sharma, the area between Rajim and Arang is very important for archaeological importance as at Rajim, after joining with Pairi and Sondur rivers, the Mahanadi river takes a 22 degree turn to North East, which is supposed to be sacred direction as per the Vastu Shashtra. Incidentally, in the Aakar competition today one girl child made a painting of Jain Tirthankar that won the first prize.