Be courteous to patients, relatives:State Govt tells Resident Doctors

Source: The Hitavada      Date: 06 Dec 2017 09:53:03


 

By Vikas Vaidya,

DMER asks GMCs to try to become Zero Conflict Institute’

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Taking serious note of the growing complaints against Resident Doctors from patients and their relatives particularly about their rude behaviour with them, the State Government has issued a tersely worded missive to all Deans of Government Medical Colleges across Maharashtra to sensitise the Residents Doctors and impress upon them to be courteous with patients and their distressed relatives.


In fact, during last couple of years, the growing incidents of attack against Resident Doctors were traced to friction between young medicos and relatives with each side blaming other for the conflict. Enactment of special law to protect medical establishments and medical practitioners also failed to prevent growing violent incidents inside medical colleges.

Therefore, the State has finally asked the Residents also to improve their behaviour with visiting public, relatives and patients so that such unwarranted conflict could be avoided. Identifying the rude behaviour of Residents as a major cause for this growing friction, the Maharashtra Government has issued a circular wherein it has asked Deans of Government Medical Colleges (GMCs) of the state to conduct 6-monthly workshops to counsel the Resident Doctors.


Medical Education Minister Girish Mahajan has strongly supported the decision and has asked the Resident Doctors to be courteous, polite with the patients and their relatives. The Minister also wants that the Deans of the respective GMCs should endeavor to make their college the ‘Zero Conflict Institute’.


The higher authorities are often flooded with complaints of rude behaviour from Resident Doctors or their reluctance to entertain relatives. Directorate of Medical Education and Research (DMER) has tried to sort out this vexed issue and has advised the young doctors to keep a control over their language and behaviour.


DMER also agreed that Residents are terribly overloaded and hence are not in a position to entertain one and sundry. Many a times, this is misconstrued as misbehaviour. But this can not be the excuse for the Residents’ rude behaviour, the DMER circular stated while highlighting the plight of patients and their relatives admitted in public hospitals.

They require soft handling and word of sympathy. Therefore, DMER has advised the Deans to specially organise workshops to train the young medicos to cope up this pressure and to handle even a hostile and unfriendly motley crowd of relatives. The Dean have been asked to rope in psychiatrists, teachers of Preventive and Social Medicine and some expert doctors to sensitise the Residents.