SPECIAL COURTS

Source: The Hitavada      Date: 07 Dec 2018 11:59:45


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THE Supreme Court’s direction to Kerala and Bihar High Courts to set up special courts to expedite cases against MPs and MLAs, past and sitting, is a welcome and much needed step. The direction of the apex court to the two high courts came in the process of hearing of a Public Interest Litigation (PIL) which seeks to put a life ban on politicians convicted on criminal charges and also seeks expeditious trial of cases pending for years and in some cases for decades. Why should criminal cases linger on for years and even decades, is a question every common man wants to ask to the justice delivery system, the Government, the politicians themselves, while an ordinary criminal gets no leeway from law enforcing authorities. It is clear that political influence and positions of power, which many of these gentlemen enjoy, has a bearing on the process. While the political executive may not be inclined to take steps for expeditious conclusion of cases against politicians, judiciary can devise ways to deal with such cases on a priority basis and weed out the system of criminals.

 

WATER WOES


AMONG the impending threats for population across the world, water scarcity has to be at the top of the agenda. It is a menace that will affect millions of people if urgent priority is not attached to the most imminent danger. According to experts, two-thirds of the world population could be under stress due to water scarcity by the year 2025. This perception just cannot be taken lightly by all stakeholders, especially people who have refused to cooperate in Government projects launched to tackle the water crisis. Many reasons come to fore for the current situation, the top being utter neglect in management of natural water bodies. As a result, other resources like deep tubewells were explored but that only added arsenic contamination problem. Arsenic is a prime cause behind cancer as it enters the food chain through crop taken on contaminated soil. Though efforts are on to weed out the arsenic content from crop, the issue of water scarcity still needs to be addressed. It can be done only with a revolutionary movement before it is too late.