SHAMI’S INNOCENCE

Source: The Hitavada      Date: 24 Mar 2018 10:17:30


 THE Board of Control for Cricket in India deserves a pat on the back for swift probe and action in allegations of corruption against pacer Mohammed Shami. Shami’s wife, Hasin Jahan, had accused the bowler of accepting money from a Pakistani national which constitutes an offence under the Board’s anti-corruption code. The BCCI did well to immediately order an inquiry through its Anti-Corruption Unit and bring the case to its logical conclusion. Shami was exonerated of the charges and promptly handed over his Grade ‘B’ Central Contract.

In the first place, the Board should not have been concerned about the marital dispute between Shami and his wife. It was purely a personal matter, and even before a police case was registered the BCCI decided to withhold Shami’s contract. The corruption allegations came later when Jahan made a series of allegations against her husband. BCCI came into the picture at that point. The Committee of Administrators has done well to correct a wrong and hand over Shami his deserving due.

 

GREAT CAUSE

SPIRITUAL leader Sadhguru Jaggi Vasusdev has made a good case in favour of world’s water bodies that are falling prey to bad management and pollution due to human society’s failure to keep those clean. He has stressed the need to have a worldwide concerted action to protect and preserve water bodies so that the global human community continues to get clean and usable water for all the time to come. Sadhguru has raised this issue at a very proper forum of the United Nations where he also spoke on women’s empowerment as yet another global concern. 

Since water bodies are a local resource, the best way to tackle the issue of keeping those clean is to involve the local populations. Then, what does Sadhguru mean when he talks of a concerted global action? His statement can be interpreted as follows: Since water bodies form local resource, they must be maintained locally. But because they are a common human heritage, their preservation must become a common global action-plan. The slogan, therefore, could be: Think globally, act locally! That is the essence.