UNFORTUNATE

Source: The Hitavada      Date: 05 May 2018 10:01:57


IT IS really unfortunate that nearly sixty award winners boycotted the 65th National Film Awards ceremony in New Delhi because they were not to get their awards at the hands of President Mr. Ram Nath Kovind. This should never have happened at all. The President should never have restricted his presence at the awards ceremony just for one hour. For, the National film Awards are special and are meant to celebrate excellence in cinema’s various facets.

The persons who win those awards are masters in their respective domains and deserve to be given the honours straight by the President and none else. But when only eleven of the winners were slated to get the awards at the President’s hands, others were naturally going to feel upset. Whether they did right by boycotting the ceremony, will get debates for a long time. Yet, those winners were perfectly right in expecting to be honoured at the hands of the President, as the honour is so rare. There is no need to build any political hype over the boycott. Let us admit that the President should have stayed on at the ceremony full time.  

 

EARNING RESPECT

THE Australian cricket board has assigned former opener Justin Langer the onerous task of winning back respect for its cricket team, whose reputation was torn asunder after the ball-tampering scandal in South Africa. Langer has spoken of change in behaviour of the Australian cricketers that will automatically help winning the trust and respect of their fans. Although the coach’s intent is on the coin, the task is not as simple as he thinks.

The brazenness Australian cricketers indulge in, in their sole aim of winning at every cost, always takes them over the line of acceptable behaviour on the field. Aggression takes an altogether different dimension for the Aussies in their battle of oneupmanship. It always runs contrary to the spirit of cricket, attracting rebuke and punishments from the authorities. Changing this culture is the biggest impediment of every Australian cricket coach. Langer has remained a part of this culture and knows how it runs deep into their domestic structure. One hopes he makes the team see sense and move ahead.