NEGLECTED SECTOR

Source: The Hitavada      Date: 01 Jun 2018 11:47:03


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THE death of three patients in a Government hospital in Gwalior tells the story of a highly neglected sector in not just one State but all over the country. That three patients die because their ventilators stop functioning due to power outage is shameful, to say the least. This shows that Government hospitals function without as basic a facility as alternate power supply. This is entirely against the avowed aim of providing basic healthcare facilities to the last man on the ladder. It is clear that the country is legions away from that avowed goal. And this is in spite of the fact that a very large population belonging to the poor strata of the society is dependent on the public sector healthcare facility as the five-star private sector healthcare is much beyond their reach. The Union Government and the states have to wake up to this grim and serious shortcoming in the country’s governance. Unless they prioritise healthcare in their work plan, incidents like the one in Gwalior will keep on happening in some corner of the country or the other and invite the anger of the people.

FOMENTING TROUBLE

ANTI-INDUSTRY protests all over the world often spiral into an event of bloodshed and deaths when anti-social elements, backed by people and parties with vested interests, sneak in and change the entire narrative of the agitation. It was precisely the reason that resulted in 13 deaths in police firing during the protests at Sterlite Copper Plant in Tuticorin, according to superstar Rajinikanth, who has announced his plans to join politics soon. Rajini has called for a stringent, iron-fist policy to crush such anti-social elements. The actor is absolutely right in his assessment of the anti-Sterlite protests and resultant violence. Industries are often seen by many in the society as a problem rather than tools of development and prosperity. It is mostly the political elements who keep fomenting troubles against industries for their electoral gains. An agitation in industry, of howsoever minimal significance, is then used by such politicians to play their dirty cards. Be it Manesar or Tuticorin, it is always the poor labourer who pays with his life in this political game.