When protector turns predator

Source: The Hitavada      Date: 01 Jul 2018 11:42:12


 

By Anshuman Bhargava,

WHAT HAS GONE WRONG WITH THE SOCIETY?


Fathers, who have an abusive stance towards their daughters, not only lose their right to be called fathers but also don’t deserve to be considered humans. This is the most animalistic and imbecile of instincts, that is akin to savagery


This can set an example for many women that silent acceptance is not what must be entertained and when it needs, the voice must be raised against the wrongdoer even if he happens to be the husband


voice must be raised against the wrongdoer


such examples will infuse strength in women and give them a cue that things must not be allowed to happen under their nose without a demur

 


 

 

Rape is not a new thing in Indian society and its widespread prevalence is nothing to write home about. It is a national shame and deep ignominy we have to live with. But a more disturbing trend that is picking up is the involvement or a rather direct perpetration of the heinous crime by fathers on their daughters.


Though not of endemic proportions, such incidents are, however, growing in number and thereby pointing towards a new definition of perversion. The recent murder of Dr Khan in Jabalpur at the behest of his wife brought into light an abominable crime of a father harbouring ill intentions towards his daughter.


Ayesha Khan, wife of deceased Dr Khan, told the mediapersons that her husband was a blot on society and was trying to make physical relations with his own daughter. He had been keeping a bad moral character for long and she was annoyed at the vulgar intentions of her husband for his own daughter.


He even allegedly used to say that he will not let the daughter get married. Dr Shapathullah Khan, posted as Deputy Director, Regional Health Services, Jabalpur Division, was brutally killed by two unidentified men with sharp-edged weapons at his residence earlier this month.
During the investigation, police sought information about family members of Dr Khan and his wife Ayesha and learnt about her niece named Nandini alias Jannat Khan lived in Gujarat. In further investigation, police found evidence that Nandini was present in Jabalpur on the day of the murder.


Acting promptly on the information, police team detained Nandini for further investigation. In the interrogation, she broke out and confessed to the conspiracy of killing Dr Khan. Nandini disclosed that Ayesha was annoyed with the behaviour of her husband and earlier planned to kill her husband but failed in the same.


Though murder can in no way be supported or appreciated and no one has the right to take law in his or her hand, there are times when things need to be seen in the light of truth and the complexity of the situation. There are little nuances in familial relationships and intimate circles that cannot be defined by law in legal terms.


There are crimes of subtle nature that cannot be reported to the police as they don’t make a defined crime. Some of them are atrocious and insulting for womanhood and they cannot be tackled with sanity or decency but neither can they be dealt with legally.


Evil intentions, for instance, can be understood and gauged by the wife or the sister or mother or even the kids in the family, but they cannot be proved. Sometimes the male libido and its dominative proclivity take such an upper hand in less evolved persons that it goes out of control and the victim or her sympathisers run short of options to get things back on track and restore normalcy at home.


In such desperate junctures, the only way that remains is to eliminate the perpetrator to get rid of the evil aspersions that he is a potential carrier of. How much courage one musters up to do this act or how she shores up the resources to give wings to her plan is a different thing and involves other aspects of socio-legal reaches.


But to lay the blame squarely on the murder plotters or murderers is not total justice. Fathers, who have an abusive stance towards their daughters, not only lose their right to be called fathers but also don’t deserve to be considered humans. This is the most animalistic and imbecile of instincts, that is akin to savagery.


A father is a source and shelter of security and trust for a daughter. If a father breaches that trust even for a minute, he is fit to be pilloried and reproached. There is no way such primaeval instincts and aberrations of the mind can be controlled without medical intervention or counselling by an expert.


This is almost an impossibility in the Indian context given the lack of psychological support structure in the ecosystem around us and the reluctance of the patient, first to acknowledge his problem and second, to get it treated by a professional. In India, a visit to the psychiatrist is still considered a sign of madness and people, therefore, avoid consulting one unless it gets absolutely necessary and is supported by his/her personal wisdom and reasoning.
Dr Khan in all likelihood did not listen to his wife’s advice and protestations against his actions and tendencies. She must have suffered the ignominy silently for long, without finding any solution to the malady that was ruining her daughter’s life. A daughter’s woes cannot be understood by anyone better than her mother.


The daily torture the mother and daughter might have borne due to the misdemeanour of the doctor must have been unbearable and be bursting at the seams, which must have forced the mother to take the extreme step to save her daughter’s pride and prestige and give her a secure future. It is never easy to kill one’s husband, which is why the intensity of the daily pain she was suffering must be taken into account.


Ayesha must be punished for the wrong she has done by hatching the plot of her husband’s murder because one kind of violence is not supposed to be settled by another equally gory violence. That is not the norm of civilisation and no law permits that. But given the precarious and peculiar situation, the woman was in and the noble intention of saving her daughter for which she devised the vicarious plan in her predicament, the quantum of punishment to be awarded to her must be scaled down.
In India, it takes a lot for a woman in an ordinary household to pin down a male member, especially who is an integral and vital part of the family, which is why male domination and undue chauvinism is widespread.


In the largely feudal familial structure, the male members often have an upper hand and things like marital rape and other kinds of tortures on wives are common and grossly underreported. Most wives accept such inhuman treatment as their fate. That’s why in what Ayesha did, there is certainly a hint of courage in breaking away from the subjugation and it must be given the credit it deserves.
This can set an example for many women that silent acceptance is not what must be entertained and when it needs, the voice must be raised against the wrongdoer even if he happens to be the husband.


In nine out of ten cases it will not find manifestation in such extremity as murder, but at least such examples will infuse strength in women and give them a cue that things must not be allowed to happen under their nose without a demur.