Success of water scheme brings hope of drought-free Mah

Source: The Hitavada      Date: 02 Jul 2018 09:30:05


 

MUMBAI,


The micro-irrigation project, called ‘Jalyukt Shivar’, involves deepening and widening of streams, construction of cement and earthen stop dams, and digging of farm ponds, to make the State free of drought by next year

THE Maharashtra Government’s flagship water conservation scheme claims to have rejuvenated water bodies and created an additional storage potential, in a State where some parts perennially face a drought-like situation.
Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis said the credit for the scheme’s “success” goes to the huge public participation, and expressed hope that drought would soon become a thing of the past for the State.


The micro-irrigation project, called ‘Jalyukt Shivar’, involves deepening and widening of streams, construction of cement and earthen stop dams, and digging of farm ponds, to make the State free of drought by next year.
Under the scheme, a water storage capacity of 17,27,229 TMC (thousand million cubic feet) has been created across 16,521 villages in 34 districts of the State since 2015, according to official figures.


The data mentions that in 2015-2016, 100 per cent work under the scheme was completed in 6,202 villages. In 2016-17, out of the total 5,288 villages where the project was taken up, 100 per cent work was completed in 5,114 villages and 80 per cent in 174 villages. In 2017-18, out of 5,031 villages selected for the scheme, 100 per cent work was completed in 396 villages, 80 per cent in 1,247 villages, while work was on in the remaining 3,418 villages.
Thus, out of the total 16,521 villages, 100 per cent work has been completed in 11,712 villages and 80 per cent in 1,421 villages.


An irrigation potential of 22,74,744 hectares has thereby been created in these villages, according to the data.
Fadnavis said when people consider any scheme as their mission or a movement it is bound to be successful, and Jalyukt Shivar is the best example of this.


“With this scheme, we have not only been able to reduce the number of tankers (for water supply in districts facing scarcity) but farmers are now able to take two to three crops (for cultivation) and water the plants even during rain gaps,” he said.


In 2013-14, there was 124 per cent rainfall and the agriculture production was 137.91 lakh metric tonnes (MT). However, in 2017-18, despite rainfall being 84.3 per cent of its total capacity, there was an agricultural production of 132.83 lakh MT, Fadnavis said.