Maximize Tech Use

Source: The Hitavada      Date: 08 Jul 2018 10:01:32


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The major reason why we lag is the lack of adequate original and advanced research in our universities and technical institutes. We are more geared towards producing white collar workers in hordes than scientists and innovators.

There are many areas and aspects of life in India which have still not been blessed with technological intervention. This brings our development index down. Countries like Japan, Germany, Korea, Singapore and the US etc have made technological innovations their mainstay of development

RECENTLY speaking at the 51st convocation of IIT-Kanpur, President Ram Nath Kovind said the technology could be used to maximise the reach of several Government initiatives and students must contribute to such national missions.


Giving away degrees to 1,500 students, the President told the passing out students, “Today’s India offers unprecedented hope and avenues….Our fast-growing economy offers you huge scope. With your talent, your education and your IIT degree, each of you can be a game changer for India.” He said the Government had undertaken many initiatives to improve the quality of life of citizens. “Technology can be a force multiplier for programmes like Atal Mission for Rejuvenation and Urban Transformation or AMRUT, the Deen Dayal Upadhyaya Gram Jyoti Yojana, Digital India, Make in India, Start-up India, and the Swachh Bharat Abhiyan.


As you build your careers, please attempt to contribute to such national missions,” he told the students. Technology is undoubtedly one of the major building blocks of a successful society and nation.


The world today is getting more and more technology-driven for most of its day to day working. India cannot afford to lag. How fast we adopt newer technologies and how well we orient and adapt ourselves to them is going to decide our development potential. India is a big country with vast and diverse requirements and priorities and thus her technological needs too are immense. There are many areas and aspects of life in India which have still not been blessed with technological intervention. This brings our development index down. Countries like Japan, Germany, Korea, Singapore and the US etc have made technological innovations their mainstay of development.


Without a very established technological underpinning, these societies would not have developed the way they have. Technology has pervaded each and every aspect of the lives of the people in these countries and this has made their lives easy, comfortable and secure. Had India been bestowed with such technological prowess, many of our social ills would have ended or at least could be addressed more efficiently.


India is reaching there but the progress is slow. Instead of the giant leap we are still taking baby steps. By the time we are acquiring one technology, developed countries are inventing ten others, each a notch more advanced than the last. In India, the alacrity and the aggressive progression towards embracing technology are not there. Perhaps the Indian mind is not basically oriented towards a fast-paced computerised environment where humans work as machines. We need and make a space outside of work even within our professional setups. We are inclined to have more human connections and involvement than that of machines. But that is more a hypothesis than a factual assessment.


The major reason why we lag is the lack of adequate original and advanced research in our universities and technical institutes. We are more geared towards producing white collar workers in hordes than scientists and innovators. This trend is detrimental to the interests of the country. Everyone wants an early job with good money and future. The major driving force for most students in India is the plump job offering they will have on hand at the end of their study. This is very different from the Western mind, where original contribution to science and technology is the most valuable thing one can dream of. Here, no one wants to risk his fortunes for a pioneering research work that could be a boon for humanity. Perhaps due to the dominant middle-class mentality that India is run by, money becomes a raging priority ahead of anything else. Our education system is also to be blamed because it makes us rote-learners who are best at parroting the written letters.


Originality is not promoted, encouraged or much appreciated. The ecosystem is such that any out of the box thinking is seen either with suspicion or greeted with ridicule. The mantra is to follow the fixed norms and contribute in maintaining the order of the flock.


Any deviation, no matter how much potential it holds, is not given the space to bloom. Most of our teachers, bred and groomed in the same education setup as they are, don’t feel confident enough to encourage novelty and thus downplay the possibilities of something new to evolve. People in general in India want to tread the beaten track and maintain the status quo.


Everyone wants to play safe and is happy remaining tamed within the set framework unquestioned, no matter how obsolete it is. This laxity spells doom for our technological progression. This is the reason why there is no drastic change in our education system even as we still follow the jaded British system of the 19th century, much of which has been dumped by England itself. These apart, there are other concerns as well. Our research facilities are still not of the global standard in many areas. Beyond the state-of-the-art facilities like DRDO, ISRO, BARC, IITs etc, there is not much to feel good about.

Government funding for education and research is still dismal compared to other countries. We also lack the huge amount of money that is needed to develop the technology. We end up borrowing and buying technology in bits and pieces from foreign nations through leases or loans. There is hardly anything we produce in India indigenously without some foreign assistance by way of tech imports etc. Many of our major defence tools and advanced weaponry are stuck in the labs for decades, still going through the trial and error stage, while countries like China and even Israel are enhancing their capabilities by leaps and bounds, depending lesser and lesser on other countries.


Advanced helicopters, planes, ships, submarines and guns which we should have started manufacturing several decades ago are still purchased from other countries for want of an advanced technological establishment in the country. The President’s words thus hold much significance at this juncture. It should be an eye-opener both for the students, future technocrats and policymakers. We have fallen into a stupor which we urgently need to get out of. We must collectively change our stance and attitude and give heightened importance to technological innovations in the country. Today from our home water purifier to the metro rail system, from mobile telephony to internet money transfer, every need is catered to by cutting-edge technology.


It is certain that without technology, we cannot survive unless we want to live the primitive life. It is important that rather than planning to settle abroad and serve an American company, our youngsters should focus on how to make the best use of the resources and potentials available here in our own country.