Vegetable prices shoot up on lower supplies

Source: The Hitavada      Date: 11 Sep 2018 10:15:39


 

 

Business Bureau

Housewives will now have to shell out extra money to buy vegetables as the prices have shot up due to dwindling supplies in the wholesale market.


Due to lower supply of local vegetables the prices have surged by 10 per cent to 15 per cent compared to last weeks prices in the wholesale vegetable market popularly known as Cotton Market. Announcing this here in the city on Monday, Ram Mahajan, Secretary of Mahatma Phule Sabji Fruit Adtiya Association, Nagpur said, “On account of Pola festival most farmers stayed at home and did not send their produce during the early morning hours in the wholesale market. The market wore a deserted look and was open only till 11 am”.


Currently, local supplies constitute about 10 per cent of the total vegetables unloaded at the wholesale market. The rest 90 per cent is being brought from far-off places to meet the requirements of consumers. With restricted supplies the prices of vegetables have moved upwards. Also, the number of small and medium sized vehicles had come down between 80 to 100 vehicles compared to more than 200 during the months of November and December which is considered as the peak season.


Mahajan said that the vegetable prices being quoted at the wholesale vegetable market were as follows: Lady Finger at Rs 30 to Rs 40 per kilo, Tomato at Rs 20 per kilo, Green Chilli at Rs 40 to Rs 50 per kilo, Cabbage at Rs 15 per kilo, Cauliflower at Rs 30 per kilo, Eggplant at Rs 15 to Rs 20 per kilo, Mustard Greens at Rs 10 to Rs 20 per kilo, Bell Pepper at Rs 40 per kilo, Pumpkin at Rs 20 per kilo, Beans at Rs 30 per kilo, Bitter Gourd at Rs 40 per kilo, Bottle Gourd at Rs 10 to Rs 15 per kilo, Coriander Leaf at Rs 80 per kilo, Cluster Beans at Rs 40 per kilo and Fenugreek Leaf at Rs 40 to Rs 50 per kilo depending on the quality.


However, it is expected that the local vegetable supplies will start arriving at the market from next month in large quantities and cool down the prices to a large extent, Mahajan pointed out.